Irish Sagas at UCC University College Cork

CDI
CELT

 

Acallamh na Senórach

Background information

References in the Annals of the Four Masters, the Annals of Tigernach and the Annals of Ulster


M15.1 The first year of Fearadhach Finnfeachtnach as king over Ireland; good was Ireland during his time.

M36.1 Fearadhach Finnfeachtnach, son of Crimhthann Niadhnair, after having spent twenty two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, died at Teamhair.

M56.1 Fiacha Finnfolaidh, after having been seventeen years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was killed by the provincial kings.

M106.1 Tuathal Teachtmhar, after having been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Mal, son of Rochraidhe, King of Ulster.

M157.1 Conn of the Hundred Battles, after having been thirty five years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Tibraite Tireach, son of Mal, son of Rochraidhe, King of Ulster, at Tuath Amrois.

M195.1 After Art, the son of Conn of the Hundred Battles, had been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he fell in the battle of Magh Mucruimhe, by Maccon and his foreigners.

M266.1 Forty years was Cormac, son of Art, son of Conn, in the sovereignty of Ireland, when he died at Cleiteach.

M268.1 The first year of Cairbre Liffeachair, son of Cormac, son of Art, in the sovereignty of Ireland.

T (p. 21 (101) Find, grandson of Baiscne, was beheaded by Aichlech, son of Dubdriu, and by the sons of Uirgriu, of the Luaigni of Tara, at Áth Brea on the Boyne.

M283.2 Finn, grandson of Baisgne, fell by Aichleach, son of Duibhdreann, and the sons of Uirgreann of the Luaighni Teamhrach, at Ath Brea, upon the Boinn, of which was said:

Finn was killed, it was with darts,
With a lamentable wound;
Aichleach, son of Duibhdreann, cut off
The head of the son of Mochtamuin.

Were it not that Caeilti took revenge,
It would have been a victory after all his true battles;
The three were cut off by him,
Exulting over the head of the royal champion.


T (p. 23 (103)) Carbre Lifechair fell in the battle of Gabra Aithle (leg. Aichle ?) by Seníach son of Fer Cirb of the Fothairt.

M284.1 After Cairbre Liffeachair had been seventeen years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he fell in the battle of Gabhra Aichle, by the hand of Semeon, son of Cearb, [one] of the Fotharta; Fearcorb, the son of Cormac Cas, having brought the Fiana with him, against the king, to defend Leath Mhogha against him.

M285.1 Fothadh was one year over Ireland, when Fothadh Cairptheach was slain by Fothadh Airgtheach. Fothadh Airgtheach was afterwards slain in the battle of Ollarba, in Magh Line, by Caeilte.

M432.1 The fourth year of Laeghaire.

M432.2 Patrick came to Ireland this year, and proceeded to baptize and bless the Irish, men, women, sons, and daughters, except a few who did not consent to receive faith or baptism from him, as his Life relates.

M489.3 Aenghus, son of Nadfraech, King of Munster, fell in the battle of Cell Osnadha.

M493.2 When the time of St. Patrick’s death approached, he received the Body of Christ from the hands of the holy Bishop Tassach, in the 122nd [year] of his age, and resigned his spirit to heaven.

U565.1 The slaying of Diarmait son of Cerball i.e. by Aed Dub son of Suibne and the two sons of Mac Erca, Forgus and Domnall, succeeded him.

M1152.4 A synod was convened at Droichet-atha by the bishops of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick, and the Cardinal Johannes Papiron, with three hundred ecclesiastics, both monks and canons.

M1157.9 A synod was convened by the clergy of Ireland, and some of the kings, at the monastery of Droicheat-atha, the church of the monks. There were present seventeen bishops, together with the Legate and the successor of Patrick.

U1157.4 The successor of Patrick (namely, the archbishop of Ireland) consecrated the church of the Monks [of Mellifont, near Drogheda].


Lebor Gabála Érenn (Macalister), Volume 4

p. 11: The Fir Bolg gave them [the Tuatha De Danann] battle upon Mag Tuired; they were a long time fighting that battle. At last it broke against the Fir Bolg, and the slaughter pressed northward, and a hundred thousand of them were slain westward to the strand of Eochaill [Traig nEothaili]. There was the king Eochu overtaken and he fell at the hands of the three sons of Nemed.


Lebor Gabála Érenn (Macalister), Volume 5

p. 305 Feradach Finn-Fechtnach son of Crimthann Nia Náir … took the kingship of Ireland for a space of twenty years.

p. 307 Fíachu Finnolach took the kingship of Ireland for the space of fifteen years.

p. 311 Túathal fell in Dál Araide … at the hands of Mál son of Rochraide king of the province. … But thirty years was he in the kingship of Ireland.

p. 341 The Fothads took the kingship of Ireland for one year, till Fothad Cairptech fell at the hands of Fothad Airgdech, and he fell thereafter in the battle of Ollarba.


The History of Ireland (Geoffrey Keating), Volume 1

pp. 217-219 Of the branching of the tribe that was noblest of the Tuatha Dé Danann down here.
Eochaidh Ollathar, i.e. the Daghdha, Oghma, Allód, Breas and Dealbhaoth, the five sons of Ealatha … Manannán son of Allód, son of Ealatha … Aonghus, Aodh, Cearmadh and Mídhir, the four sons of the Dághdha. Lúgh, son of Cian, son of Dianchéacht … Goibhneann the smith … Dianchéacht the physician.

p. 221 Nuadha Airgeadlámh … took the kingdom of Ireland thirty years, till he fell in the battle of Magh Tuireadh North.
Lúgh Lámhfada, son of Cian, son of Dianchéacht, … held the kingdom of Ireland forty years.


The History of Ireland (Geoffrey Keating), Volume 2

pp. 235-237 Fearadhach Fionn Feachtnach, son of Criomhthann Nia Nar, … held the sovereignty of Ireland twenty years. … He was called Fearadhach Feachtnach because justice and truth maintained in Ireland in his time. For feachtnach means ‘truthful’.
Fiachaidh Fionnoladh son of Fearadhach Fionn Feachtnach, … held the sovereignty of Ireland twenty-seven years. And this Fiachaidh was treacherously slain by the rustic tribes of Ireland.

p. 243 Tuathal Teachtmhar son of Fiachaidh Fionnoladh … held the sovereignty of Ireland thirty years. He was called Tuathal Teachtmhar, as every good came in his time.

pp. 255-257 It was this Tuathal Teachtmhar of whom we are speaking who imposed the Boraimhe on the people of Leinster, as a tax to avenge the death of his two daughters, whose names were Fithir and Dairine. Now, there was a king over Leinster whose name was Eochaidh Aincheann, and he married Dairine, daughter of Tuathal Teachtmhar, and took her to Leinster to his own fortress, that is to Magh Luadhat; and some time after that he went to Tara and told Tuathal that Dairine had died, and asked him to give him his other daughter, that is Fithir, and Tuathal gave her to him, and he took her to Leinster to his own fortress; and when Fithir saw her sister Dairine alive before her, her soul quitted her body suddenly through shame; and Dairine having come to lament her died of her grief on the spot …
Now when Tuathal heard of the death of the two ladies he became enraged, and sent out messengers in all directions to the nobles of Ireland to complain of the treachery which the king of Leinster had practised against him; and accordingly the nobles of Ireland gave aid in warriors and auxiliaries to Tuathal with a view to avenge this outrage; and when Tuathal resolved to plunder and despoil the people of Leinster though they were unable to meet him in the field, they agreed to pay a tribute, themselves, and their descendants to Tuathal, and to each king who should succeed him, as a retribution for the death of these ladies.
The following is the amount of the tribute that was paid every second year by the Leinstermen to the kings of Ireland as a penalty for the death of the children of Tuathal, namely, three score hundred cows, three score hundred ounces of silver, three score hundred mantles, three score hundred hogs, three score hundred wethers, three score hundred bronze caldrons.

p. 275 This Cormac Cas son of Oilill Olom was the fifth best champion in Ireland in his own time; the other four were Lughaidh Lamha, Fionn son of Cumhall, …

p. 301 Cairbre Lithfeachair fell by the Fian at the Battle of Gabhra.

p. 355 Cairbre Lithfeachair son of Cormac, son of Art Aoinfhear, son of Conn Ceadchathach, … held the sovereignty of Ireland twenty-seven years; and he was called Cairbre Lithfeachair because it was near the Lithfe in Leinster that he was brought up. And his mother was Eithne Ollamhdha daughter of Dunlaing son of Eanna Nia. And Cairbre was slain at the Battle of Gabhra by Simeon son of Cearb, one of the Fortuatha of Leinster; and the reason why the Battle of Gabhra was fought was: Samhaoir daughter of Fionn son of Cumhall was the wife of Cormac Cas son of Oilill Olom, and she was the mother of Tinne and Connla and Mogh Corb; and it was by reason of that relationship that Mogh Corb protected his mother’s brother, that is, Oisin son of Fionn, and the clanna Baoiscne from being overpowered by Cairbre Lithfeachair and Aodh Caomh son of Garaidh Glundubh of the race of Morna; and at that time the clanna Morna formed the regular army of Ireland; and they were at enmity with Fionn and with the clanna Baoiscne for seven years. Hence the party of Garaidh Glundubh incited Cairbre Lithfeachair and the provincial kings of Ireland to dethrone Mogh Corb in the hope that, as a consequence of this, the clanna Baoiscne would be banished. And this led to the Battle of Gabhra.

p. 357 Fothaidh Airgtheach and Fothaidh Cairptheach … assumed the sovereignty of Ireland. They both reigned conjointly one year. And Fothaidh Cairptheach fell by Fothaidh Airgtheach, and Fothaidh Airgtheach fell by the Fian in the Battle of Ollarbha.

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To save space, online sources for the sagas listed below are given only for editions with English translations. Full information on other online sources for these sagas is available at: Fenian Cycle.

Line-numbers are given for each reference to Acallamh na Senórach to facilitiate locating the reference in the CELT edition as a single file.

Related saga online: Cath Gabhra (The Battle of Gabhra)
Nicholas O’Kearney (ed. & tr.), The Battle of Gabhra, Transactions of the Ossianic Society, for the year 1853, vol. 1 (Dublin, 1854), pp. 134-153.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 134-153); English translation at MaryJones.us
Cath Gabra (Section 1, l. 1)

Related saga online: Scél asa m-berar go m-bad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán (A Story from which it is inferred that Mongán was Find Mac Cumaill)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), The Voyage of Bran son of Febal to the land of the living, (David Nutt: London, 1895), Volume 1, pp. 45-52.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 45-52); Irish text at CELT; English translation at Sacred-Texts.com; English translation at MaryJones.us
Cath Ollarba (Section 1, ll. 1-2), Cáilte killed Fothad Airgdech at the battle of Ollarba, pp. 51-52

Related poem online: Reicne Fothaid Canainne
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), Reicne Fothaid Canainne, in: Fianaigecht,(Dublin: Hodges Figgis, 1910), pp. 4-17.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 4-17); Digital Edition at NLS.uk (pp. 4-17 (38-51)); Irish Text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
Fiac’s Pool on the River Boyne (Section 5, l. 56), Fothad Canann fell there,  p. 11, stanza 1
Fathadh = (Fothad Canann) (Section 8, ll. 99-100), his death in the battle of Clárach, p. 11, stanza 3

Related text online: Tírechán’s Life of St. Patrick
Ludwig Bieler (ed. & tr.), The Patrician texts in the Book of Armagh, (Dublin: Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, 1979; repr. 2004), pp. 123-163.
English translation at Confessio.ie
Sechnall (Section 9, l. 106), bishop Secundinus, §6.2, §34.1
Beneoin (Section 43, l. 513), bishop Benignus, §5.2-5.4, §6.2, §8.3-8.4, §24.1, §30.3-30.4
Brocan (Section 53, l. 607), Brocidius, §6.4, §30.3
Soichell (Section 263, l. 3495), bishop Sachel(l)us, §6.2, §30.3, §32.5
Patrick in servitude to Milcu mac h-úi Buain (Section 278, l. 3691), §1. 2
Patrick at the Rock of Cashel (Section 389, l. 5397), §51.4
Bishop Gedech (Section 575, l. 7727); bishop Cethiacus, §6.2, §27.3-4, §29.3, §30.3-30.4
Patrick at Ached Fobuir (Section 579, l. 7763-4), §37
Patrick at Cruachán Aigli (Section 580, l. 7770), §38

Related saga online: Macgnimartha Find (The Boyish Exploits of Finn)
Kuno Meyer (ed.), Macgnimartha Find, Revue Celtique, 5, 1882, pp. 195-204.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 195-204)

Kuno Meyer (tr.), The Boyish Exploits of Finn, Ériu, 1, 1901, pp. 180-190.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 180-190 (45-55)); Digital Edition at JSTOR; Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at MaryJones.us; English translation at Tech Screpta
Finn’s dét fis (knowledge-tooth) (Section 20, l. 203), §18, pp. 185-186 (50-51)

The spear of Fiacha mac Congha (Section 137, ll. 1744-45):

§25, p. 188 (53)

 

 

‘Come hither, O she-leech of Amartha,

‘On the Barrow, by a sharp-pointed (birga) spear,

by Fiacha mac Congha’s spear

Aed, Fidga’s son has fallen:

— by the fatal mantle and by the pointed javelin (birgha)—

By the spear of Fiachail, Codna’s son,

Aillen mac Midhna is slain!’

Finn has slain him …’

 

 

The spear of Finn (Section 140, l. 1769):

§24, p. 188 (53)

 

 

‘the spear’s constant original name was birgha

‘Finn made a cast with the spear of Fiachail mac Conchinn.’


Related text online: Muirchú’s Life of St. Patrick
Ludwig Bieler (ed. & tr.), The Patrician texts in the Book of Armagh, (Dublin: Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, 1979; repr. 2004), pp. 61-123.
English translation at Confessio.ie
In Táilcinn (Shaven-head: name for Patrick) (Section 31, l. 327), §I.10.6
Beneoin (Section 43, l. 506), Bishop Benignus, I.20.11-13, §I.28.3-5
Patrick in servitude to Milcu mac h-úi Buain (Section 278, l. 3691), Preface.6
Patrick was anxious to visit Miliucc, §I.11.2, §I.11.7,
Death of Miliucc, §I.12.1

Related saga online: Altram Tige Dá Medar (The Nourishment of the Houses of the Two Milk-Vessels)
Lilian Duncan (ed. & tr.), Altram Tige Dá Medar, Ériu, 11, 1932, pp. 184-225.
Digital Edition at JSTOR
Cluain Cessain (Section 42, l. 493), p. 223:
‘Knowledge of the name of the cleric to whom the maiden came, i.e. he was Ceasan, son of the king of Alba, and chaplain to Patrick, and he took a dislike to the hermitage through Ethne’s dying in it, and he left it, and goes to Fidh Gaible, and founded a church there, so that there is the church named from him, i.e. Cluain Ceasain in Ros Mic Treoin in Fidh Gaible, and it was a hunting camp of the Fiana before that.’

Feast of Goibniu (Section 506, l. 6806), p. 207:
‘And to every one of the Tuatha De Danann to whom it was fitting to get an abode and a seat of dignity, Manannan appointed a special abode for every good man, and the Feth Fiadha and the Feast of Goibhne and the swine of Manannan were made for the warriors, i.e. the Feth Fiadha through which the chiefs were not seen, and the Feast of Goibhne to ward off age and death from the high kings, and the swine of Manannan to be killed and to continue to exist for the warriors.’

Related text online: Bethu Phátraic (The Tripartite life of Patrick)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), The Tripartite life of Patrick: with other documents relating to that saint, Vol. I (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1887).
Digital Edition at Archive.org
Patrick at Ard Pátricc (Section 56, l. 709), p. 209
Patrick at Loch Cróine (Section 80, l. 1015), p. 87
Patrick at Uarán nGarad (Sections 102-103, ll. 1313-1333), p. 107
Patrick at Es mac n-Eirc = Es ui Fhloinn (Section 113, ll. 1502-3), pp. 143-145
Patrick at Caissel na Ríg (Section 387, ll. 5387-8), pp. 195-197
Patrick at Achad Abair Umaill (Section 579; ll. 7763-4, p. 113)
Patrick at Cruach Patric = Cruachan Aigle (Section 580, l. 7770), p. 85, pp. 113-121

Related saga online: Cath Fionntrágha (The Battle of Ventry)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), The Cath Finntrága or Battle of Ventry, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1895), pp. 1-57.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 1-57 (29-85)); English translation at MaryJones.us
Poem ‘Geisid cuan’ (Section 64, ll. 843-864), pp. 54-57 (83-86)

Cecilly O’Rahilly (ed.), Cath Fionntrágha, (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962; repr. 1975), pp. 1-47.
Irish text at CELT
Poem ‘Geisid cuan’ (Section 64, ll. 843-864), pp. 45-47

Related saga online: Cath Maige Mucrama (The Battle of Mag Mucrama)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), The Battle of Mag Mucrime, Revue Celtique, 13, 1892, pp. 434-467; 14, 1893, pp. 95-96.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 434-467); (pp. 95-96)
Oilill Olom mac Mogha Nuadat, (Section 90, l. 1149), §1, p. 435
Sadb ingen Cuind (Section 90, l. 1151), §1, p. 435
Ferchis mac Comáin (Section 90, l. 1154), §3, p. 435
Benne Brit (Section 90, l. 1158), §56, p. 459
Lugaid Lága (Section 436, l. 5935), §56, p. 459
Uaim Cruachan (the cave of Cruachan) (Section 570, l. 7677), §34, p. 449

Related saga online: Forbuis Droma Damhghaire (The Siege of Knocklong)
Marie-Louise Sjoestedt (ed. & tr.), Le siège de Druim Damhghaire: Forbuis Droma Damhghaire, Revue Celtique, 43, 1926, pp. 8–123; 44, 1927, pp. 157–164, 169-176.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 8-123 (18-123)); (pp. 157-164); (pp. 169-176); French translation at CELT; French translation at Tech Screpta

Seán Ó Duinn (tr.), Forbhais Droma Dámhgháire: The Siege of Knocklong, (Cork: Mercier Press, 1992; repr. Irish American Book Co., 1993), pp. 12-111.
English translation at CELT
Death of Fiacha Muillethan (Section 90, l. 1161), §125

It was thus it happened – the tragic death of Fiacha. All this occurred at Áth Tuisil (the Ford of the Fall). It is from what happened here that the ford is so called ever since, as the ancient verse says:

Áth Tuisil is the name of the ford;
everybody knows the true reason for this –
the fall which Connla from Cnoc Dean
inflicted on good Fiacha Moilleathan.

Related saga online: Compert Fiachach Muillethain (The conception and birth of Fiachu Muillethan)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), A Note about Fiacha Muillethan, Revue Celtique, 11, 1890, 41-45.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 41-45); Irish text at TLH; English translation at TLH; English translation at Tech Screpta
Fiacha Muillethan and Caissel na Ríg (Section 390, l. 5421)

Related poem online: Tóiteán Tighe Fhinn (The Burning of Finn’s House)
E. J. Gwynn (ed. & tr.), The Burning of Finn’s House, Ériu, 1, pp. 16-33.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 16-33 (28-48); Digital Edition at JSTOR; Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
‘Then in the bruidhen he kindled a great fire’ (Section 105, l. 1378)

Related saga online: Tóruigheacht Dhiarmuda agus Ghráinne (The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Grainne)
Standish H. O’Grady (ed. & tr.), Tóruigheacht Dhiarmuda agus Ghráinne: The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Grainne, Dublin: M. H. Gill & Son, Part 1, 1880; Part 2, 1881.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (Part 1); Digital Edition at Archive.org (Part 2); English translation at MaryJones.us
Death of Diarmait ó Duibhne (Section 114, l. 1516), Part 2, §47, p. 53

Related poem online: Oenach indiu luid in rí (Find and the Phantoms)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), Find and the Phantoms, Revue Celtique, 7, 1886, pp. 289-307.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 289-307 (349-367)); Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
‘Caeilte’s race’ (Sections 121-124, ll. 1595-1618) contains four quatrains which correspond to four quatrains in this poem:
(Section 121, ll. 1597-1598), ll. 17-20, p. 291 (351)
(Section 122, ll. 1606-1607), ll. 57-60, p. 293 (353)
(Section 123, ll. 1612-1613), ll. 29-32, p. 293 (353)
(Section 123, ll. 1614-1615), ll. 65-68, p. 295 (355)

Related poem online: The Finn episode from Gilla in Chomded húa Cormaic’s poem “A Rí richid, réidig dam”
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), Fianaigecht,(Dublin: Hodges Figgis, 1910), pp. 46-51.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 46-51); Digital Edition at NLS.uk (pp. 46-51 (80-85)); Irish Text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
Finn and Aillén (Sections 129-139, ll. 1654-1761), §§5-6, p. 47

In the eighth year of his life
when he was visiting Dathi’s Tara,
he slew [Aillén], whose hand was full
with candle, ... with timpán.

‘A timpán for sleep!’ said all,
the practice at each Hallowe’en,
a customary deed; every year,
lasting incitement, the candle was burning brightly.

Related saga online: Aided Finn (The Death of Finn Mac Cumaill)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), Zeitschrift für Celtische Philologie, 1, 1897, pp. 462–465.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 462-465); Irish Text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta

Standish H. O’Grady (ed. & tr.), The Panegyric of King Cormac and the death of Finn son of Cumhall, in: Silva Gadelica, (London: Williams and Norgate, 1892).
Vol. 1, pp. 89-92 (101-104); Irish text at CELT; Vol. II, pp. 96-99 (131-134); English translation at CELT

Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), On the deaths of some Irish heroes, Revue Celtique, 23, 1902, pp. 303–348, 438; 27, 1906, p. 202.
The death of Finn (Section 140, ll. 1766-1767), §§29-30, pp. 310-311, §27, p. 328, §29-30, pp. 339-340:

‘Mongan was the diadem of every troop:
he fell by the Fian of Cantire.
(i.e. the fian of Cantire killed Mongan on the brink of Loch Lo or Loch Maicil)
By the Fian of Luagne was Find’s death
at Áth Brea on the Boyne.
(i.e. by Aichlech, son of Duibriu, Find fell at Áth Brea on the Boyne, and not at Beola Broghoige in Luachair)

Finn then has been slain, Finn has been slain:
’twas by spears, a … slaughter.
Aicclech son of Duibriu cut off the head
from the neck of Murne’s son.’

The death of Finn (Section 140, ll. 1766-1767), Silva Gadelica, Vol. II, p. 145 (180):

‘In which command Finn continued until he died; and where he met his death was at Aill an Bhruic or ‘the Brock’s Cliff,’ in Luachair Degaidh.’

Finn’s deadly leap (Section 193, l. 2537-2538), Silva Gadelica, Vol. II, p. 166 (201):

‘Two hundred years in flourishing condition and thirty more free of debility
(a lengthy term) were Finn’s existence;
which brought him to the point at which he perished
in taking ‘the leap of his old age.’’

The death of Finn and his (Christian) faith (Section 193, 2583-2584), Silva Gadelica, Vol. II, p. 167 (202):

‘Seven times the great chief made act of faith
— Cumall’s son Finn, of Almha;
the seventh time, when he was well advanced,
was that which was the occasion of his end and death.’

Finn’s deadly leap (Section 214, l. 2873), Silva Gadelica, Vol. II, p. 175 (210):

‘Finn of the Fianna [when his time came]
was slain performing his heroic leap.’

Related saga online: Fotha Catha Cnucha (The Cause of the Battle of Cnucha)
W. M. Hennessy (ed. & tr.), The Battle of Cnucha, Revue Celtique, 2, 1873, pp. 86-93.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 86-93); Irish text at CELT; English translation at MaryJones.us; English translation at Tech Screpta
Death of Cumall son of Trenmhor in the battle of Cnucha and the birth of Finn (Sections 129-130, ll. 1670-1676), p. 89-91
‘In Muc tShlanga’ (the prophylactic pig) (Section 170, l. 2235), pp. 92-93, note 19

Related text online: Cnucha cnoc os cionn Life
Maura Power (ed. & tr.), Cnucha cnoc os cionn Life, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 11, 1917, pp. 39-55.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 39-55)
Dindshenchas of Cnucha (Section 129, l. 1671), §§1-7, pp. 46-47
Death of Cumall son of Trenmhor in the battle of Cnucha and the birth of Finn (Sections 129-130, ll. 1670-1676), §§8-9, p. 47
Death of Cairpre Lifechair in the battle of Gabhra (Section 599, ll. 7940-7942), §44, p. 49

Related saga online: Talland Étair (The Siege of Howth)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.): The Siege of Howth, Revue Celtique, 8, 1887, pp. 47-64.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 47-64)
Mesgedhra’s brain (Section 186, l. 2394), pp. 61-63

Related saga online: Aided Chonchobuir (The Death of Conchobar)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), The Death-Tales of the Ulster Heroes, (Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co., 1906; repr. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1993), pp. 4-11, 16-17.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 4-11)
Mesgedhra’s brain (Section 186, l. 2394), §§1-6, pp. 5-7

Related texts online: Betha Caoimhgin (Life of Coemgen), Betha M’Áedócc Ferna (Life of Maedoc of Ferns)
Charles Plummer (ed. & tr.), Bethada Náem nÉrenn: Lives of the Irish Saints, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1922; repr. 1968),
Volume 1: Irish text, Volume 2: English translation.
Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT
Finn’s prophecy about St. Kevin of Glendalough (Section 186, ll. 2408-2433), pp. 121-123, pp. 127-132
Poem about St Maedoc of Ath Fearna (Ferns) (Section 196, ll. 2613-2625), pp. 186-187

Related saga online: Buile Shuibhne (The Frenzy of Suibhne)
J. G. O’Keeffe (ed.), Buile Shuibhne, (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1931; repr. 1975)
Digital Edition at Archive.org; Digital Edition at NLS.uk; Irish text at CELT

J. G. O’Keeffe (ed. & tr.), Buile Shuibhne (The Frenzy of Suibhne), (London: Irish Texts Society, 1913; repr. 1996).
English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
Suibne Geilt and the battle of Magh Rath (Section 200, l. 2668), §§7-11
Suibne Geilt and Moling’s monastery at Ros mBroc = Tech Moling (Section 200, ll. 2669-2687), §§74-86

Related text online: The Birth and Life of St. Moling
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), The Birth and Life of St. Moling, Revue Celtique, 27, 1906, pp. 257-312; 28, 1907, pp. 70-72.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 257-312); pp. 70-72
The watercourse Taediu (See Section 200, l. 2674), p. 303, l. 3 and note 1, p. 71 (note on p. 303, l. 3)

Related saga online: Bóroma (The Bóroma)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), The Bóroma, Revue Celtique, 13, 1892, pp. 32–124, 299-300.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 33-124); (pp. 299-300)
First two lines of the poem on Ros mBroc (Section 200, ll. 2672), §30, pp. 48-49
Tuathal Techtmar and his two daughters (Sections 309-313, ll. 4127-4176), §§1-7, pp. 37-39

Related saga online: Aided Echach maic Maireda (The Death of Eochaid son of Mairid)
Standish H. O’Grady (ed. & tr.), Silva Gadelica, (London: Williams and Norgate, 1892).
Vol. I, pp. 233-237 (245-249); Volume II, pp. 265-269 (300-304)
Lí Bán (Sections 242-244, ll. 3210-3241)

Related saga online: Táin Bó Cúalnge (The Cattle-raid of Cooley)
Cecile O’Rahilly (ed. & tr.), Táin Bó Cúalnge from the Book of Leinster, (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1967; repr. 2004), pp. 1-272.
Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT
The battle of Gairech and Ilgairech (Section 259, ll. 3440-1), §40, p. 267
Medb’s chariots (Section 290, ll. 3859-3870), §3, p. 153:

‘For this is how Medb was wont to travel; with nine chariots for herself alone, two chariots before her, two behind, two on each side and her chariot between them in the very middle. And the reason she used to do that was so that the clods of earth cast up by the horses’ hooves or the foam dripping from the bridle-bits or the dust raised by the mighty army might not reach her and that no darkening might come to the golden diadem of the queen.’

In Liath Macha (Section 416, l. 5740) , §3, p. 149

Related saga online: Tochmarc Étaíne (The Wooing of Étaín)
Osborn Bergin and R. I. Best (ed. & tr.), Tochmarc Étaíne, Ériu, 12, 1938, pp. 142-193.
Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT
Elcmar of the Brugh (Section 506, ll. 6804-5), §§1-9, pp. 143-149

Sanas Chormaic: Cormac’s Glossary (O’Donovan/Stokes)
p. 4 (22):
Ana, or as she is most usually called Danann, was the mother of the three chieftains of the Tuatha dé Danann, Brian, Iuchar, and Iucharbu, who were accounted gods for their feats of necromancy. The “Two Paps”, in the district of Luachair Deaghaidh in the County of Kerry, are two mountains, still so called, in the barony of Magunihy. (See Section 60, l. 774)

Lectures of the Manuscript Materials of Ancient Irish History (O’Curry)
List of Historic Tales in the Book of Leinster includes:
Tain bo Chualgne (The Cow-spoil of Cuailgne), p. 584 (620)
Tochmarc Ailbhe (The Courtship of Ailbhe), p. 585 (621)
Uath Beinne Etair (The Cave of Benn Edair), p. 587 (623)
Uath Dercce Ferna (The Cave of Dearc Ferna), p. 587 (623)
Echtra Find a nDeircferna (The Adventures of Finn in Dercfearna), p. 589 (625)
Aithed Grainne re Diarmaid (The Elopement of Grainne with Diarmait), p. 590 (626)

Airec Menman Uraird Maic Coise (Byrne), Anecdota from Irish Manuscripts, Volume 2
List of the gnathscela Herenn includes:
Tocmarc Aillbhe ingine Cormaic la Finn, p. 45 (141), §6, lines 8-9
Aithi Graine ingine Corbmaic la Diarmaid ua nDuibne, p. 45 (141), §6, lines 11-12

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D = The Martyrology of Donegal (O’Donovan)
G = The Martyrology of Gorman (Stokes)
O = The Martyrology of Oengus the Culdee (Stokes)
D: 9 November, Benignus .i. Benen, disciple of Patrick and his successor (Tl. 109) (See Section 88, l. 1091), p. 301 (363)
G: 9 November, Benignus, a bishop; St. Patrick’s disciple and his successor (See Section 88, l. 1091), p. 215
D: 1 February, Brighit, virgin, abbess of Cill-dara (See Section 390, l. 5433), pp. 35-37 (97-99)
G: 1 February, Brigit, the chief virgin of Ireland (See Section 390, l. 5433), p. 29
O: 1 February, Brigit, chaste head of Erin’s nuns See Section 390, l. 5433), p. 58 (117), p. 65-67 (124-126)
D: 3 June, Caoimhghin, Abbot of Gleann-da-loch (See Section 186, l. 2420), pp. 143-145 (205-207)
G: 3 June, Coemgen, abbot of Gleann Dá Locha (See Section 186, l. 2420), p. 109
O: 3 June, Coemgen, the chaste, fair warrior, in the Glen of two broad loughs (See Section 186, l. 2420), p. 138 (197), p. 145 (204)
D: 9 September, Ciarán, son of the carpenter, Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois (See Section 144, l. 1837), pp. 241-243 (303-305)
G: 9 September, Ciaran, the carpenter’s son, Abbot of Clonmacnois (See Section 144, l. 1837), p. 173
O: 9 September, Ciarán of Clúain (See Section 144, l. 1837), p. 193 (252), pp. 203-205 (262-264))
D: 26 September, Colman Eala, Abbot, of Lann Elo, in Fir-Ceall, in West Meath (See Section 215, l. 2885), p. 261 (323)
G: 26 September, Colmán Ela, an Abbot (See Section 215, l. 2885), p. 185
O: 26 September, Colmán from Land Elo (See Section 215, l. 2885), p. 196 (255), p. 213 (272)
D: 9 June, Colum Cille, son of Felim, abbot of Black Monks, at Doire Choluim Chille and at I in Albain (See Section 150, l. 1942), pp. 151-163 (213- 225)
G: 9 June, Colomb cille, abbot of Black Monks, at Doire Choluimb-chille and in Hí in Scotland (See Section 150, l. 1942), p. 113
O: 9 June, Colum cille (See Section 150, l. 1942), p. 139 (198), p. 145-149 (204-208)
D: 20 December, Eoghan[an], of Ard-lecach in Magh-Ene, near unto Eas Ruaidh (See Section 215, l. 2886), p. 343 (405)
G: 20 December, Euganán, from Ard Leccach in Mag Ene (See Section 215, l. 2886), p. 243
D: 31 January, Maedhóg, Bishop of Fearna. Aedh was his first name (See Section 196, l. 2613), p. 33 (95)
G: 31 January, Maedóc, of Ferna, a bishop was he: Aed was his first name (See Section 196, l. 2613), p. 27
O: 31 January, Maedóc of Ferns, i.e. my Aedóc, i.e. of the Fir Luirc of Lough Erne was he (See Section 196, l. 2613), p. 39 (98), p. 55 (114)
D: 24 December, Mochua, son of Lonan, of Tigh Mochua, in Laoighis, in Leinster (See Section 179, l. 2352), p. 347 (409)
G: 24 December, my Cua, Lonán’s ample son, from Tech mo Chua in Laigis (See Section 179, l. 2352), p. 247
O: 24 December, my Cua, of Tech Mochua in Leix of Leinster (See Section 179, l. 2352), p. 254 (313), p. 263 (322)
D: 17 June, Moling Lachra, Bishop and Confessor, of Tigh-Moling (See Section 200, l. 2666), pp. 171-173 (233-235)
G: 17 June, Moling of Luachair, bishop and confessor, from Tech Moling (See Section 200, l. 2666), p. 119
O: 17 June, Moling of Lúachar. … Great tribulation had he in founding the Táiden, from devils and packs of wolves and evil men crossing him. (See Section 200, l. 2666), p. 141 (200) , pp. 151-157 (210-216)
D: 17 March, Patrick, noble Apostle of the island of Erin (See Section 5, l. 57), pp. 79 -81(141-143)
G: 17 March, Patrick, apostle of Ireland (See Section 5, l. 57), p. 57
O: 17 March, Patrick, apostle of virginal Erin (See Section 5, l. 57), p. 82 (141), p. 99 (158)
D: 27 November, Seachnall, at Domhnach Sechnaill, in Bregia, his church is (See Section 9, l. 106), pp. 319-321 (381-383)
G: 27 November, Sechnall, from Domnach Sechnaill in the South of Bregia (See Section 9, l. 106), p. 227
O: 27 November, Sechnall has chanted a melody — a praise of Patrick of Armagh (See Section 9, l. 106), p. 237 (296), p. 248 (307)
D: 1 August, Soicheall, the bishop Soichell who is mentioned in the life of Patrick (Tl. 109) (See Section 263, l. 3495), p. 209 (271)
G: 1 August, ever-pure Sachall to console us in difficulties (See Section 263, l. 3495), p. 149

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R = The Rennes Dindshenchas (Stokes), Revue Celtique, 15-16, 1894-1895
M = The Metrical Dindshenchas (Gwynn)
B = The Bodleian Dinnshenchas (Stokes), Folklore, 3, 1892
E = The Edinburgh Dinnshenchas (Stokes), Folklore, 4, 1893
S = Silva Gadelica (O’Grady), Volume 2
R: Almu (in Adarca Hua Failgi §16) (See Section 27, l. 285), Part 1, pp. 308-309, (‘Almu’)
M: Almu I (See Section 27, l. 285), Volume 2, pp. 73-77, pp.106-107
(Quatrains from this poem occur in Fotha Catha Cnucha (See above); see also §98, ll. 1262-1265; 1278-1281)
M: Almu II (See Section 27, l. 285), Volume 2, p. 79, p.107
R: Áth Luain §66 (See Section 378, l. 5308), Part 2, pp. 464-467, (‘Áth Luain’)
M: Ath Luain (See Section 378, l. 5308), Volume 3, pp. 367-375
R: Badammair in Cenn Cuirrig §49 (See Section 409, l. 5652), Part 2, pp. 442-444, (‘Cenn Cuirrig’)
M: Bodamair in Currech Life (See Section 409, l. 5652), Volume 3, p. 235
R: Belach Gabrain §37 (See Section 598, l. 7929), Part 2, p. 426, (‘Belach Gabrain’)
M: Belach Gabran (See Section 598, l. 7929), Volume 3, p. 159
S: Bealach Gabhráin (See Section 598, l. 7929), p. 534 (569)
R: Benn Boirchi §98 (See Section 240, l. 3204), Part 3, pp. 49-50, (‘Benn Boirchi’)
M: Bend Boirche I (See Section 240, l. 3204), Volume 4, p. 145, p. 412
M: Bend Boirche II (See Section 240, l. 3204), Volume 4, p. 147, p. 413
E: Benn Bairchi §69 (See Section 240, l. 3204), pp. 487-488, (‘Benn Bairchi’)
S: Benna Bairchi (See Section 137, l. 1748), p. 527 (562)
R: Benn Étair §29 (See Section 16, l. 171), Part 1, pp. 330-332, (‘Benn Étair’)
M: Bend Etair I (See Section 16, l. 171), Volume 3, pp. 105-109
M: Bend Etair II (See Section 16, l. 171), Volume 3, pp. 111-119
S: Benn Edair (See Section 16, l. 171), p. 521 (556)
R: Berba §13 (See Section 56, l. 694),  Part 1, pp. 304-305, (‘Berba’)
M: Berba (See Section 56, l. 694), Volume 2, p. 63, p. 104
B: Berba §15 (See Section 56, l. 694), p. 483, (‘Berba’)
S: Berbha (See Section 56, l. 694), pp. 523-524 (558-559)
R: Boand §19 (See Section 5, l. 56), Part 1, pp. 315-316, (‘Boand’)
M: Boand I (See Section 5, l. 56), Volume 3, pp. 27-33
M: Boand II (See Section 5, l. 56), Volume 3, pp. 35-39
B: Boann §36 (See Section 5, l. 56), p. 500, (‘Boann’)
S: Bóann (See Section 5, l. 56), pp. 519-520 (554-555)
R: Dindgnai in Broga §4 (See Section 36, l. 374), Part 1, pp. 292-293, (‘Dindgnai in Broga’)
M: Brug na Bóinde I (See Section 36, l. 374), Volume 2, pp. 11-17, pp. 92-94
M: Brug na Bóinde II (See Section 36, l. 374), Volume 2, pp. 19-25, pp. 95-96
R: Carn Fráich §132 (See Section 107, l. 1452), Part 4, pp. 136-139, (‘Carn Fráich’)
M: Carn Fráich (See Section 107, l. 1452), Volume 3, pp. 357-363
R: Céis Coroinn in Corond §77 (See Section 113, l. 1504), Part 2, pp. 477-478, (‘Céis Coroinn’)
M: Ceis Choraind (See Section 113, l. 1504), Volume 3, p. 439
R: Cenn Febrat §48 (See Section 56, l. 707), Part 2, p. 442, (‘Cenn Febrat’)
M: Cend Febrat (See Section 56, l. 707), Volume 3, pp. 227-233
S: Cenn Febhrat (See Section 56, l. 707), p. 524 (559)
R: Cnucha §153 (See Section 129, l. 1671), Part 4, pp. 166-167, (‘Cnucha’)
M: Cnucha I (See Section 129, l. 1671), Volume 4, p. 265, p. 446
M: Cnucha II (See Section 129, l. 1671), Volume 4, pp. 265-267, pp. 446-447
E: Cnucha §77 (See Section 129, l. 1671), pp. 494-496, (‘Cnucha’)
R: Corond §77 (See Section 113, l. 1505), Part 2, pp. 477-478, (‘Corond’)
R: Crotta Cliach §47 (See Section 54, l. 615), Part 2, pp. 440-441, (‘Crotta Cliach’)
M: Crotta Cliach (See Section 54, l. 615), Volume 3, p. 225
S: Crota Cliach (See Section 54, l. 615), p. 523 (558)
R: Cruachan Aigle (in Findloch Cera §68) (See Section 493, l. 6657), Part 2, pp. 468-469, (‘Cruachan Aigle’)
M: Crúachán Aigle (See Section 493, l. 6657), Volume 4, p. 281, pp. 449-450
R: Druim Cliab §82 (See Section 114, l. 1513), Part 3, pp. 32-33, (‘Druim Cliab’)
M: Druim Cliab (See Section 114, l. 1513), Volume 4, pp. 9-11, pp. 377-378
B: Druim Cliab §34 (See Section 114, l. 1513), pp. 498-499, (‘Druim Cliab’)
S: Druim Cliabh (See Section 114, l. 1513), p. 526 (561)
R: Druim Criaich §140 (See Section 105, l. 1363), Part 4, pp. 148-150, (‘Druim Criaich’)
M: Druim Criaich (See Section 105, l. 1363), Volume 4, pp. 43-57, pp. 384-388
R: Duiblind §26 (See Section 242, l. 3231), Part 1, pp. 326-327, (‘Duiblind’)
M: Duiblind (See Section 242, l. 3231), Volume 3, p. 95
B: Duiblinn §38 (See Section 242, l. 3231), pp. 501-502, (‘Duiblinn’)
R: Ess Rúaid §81 (See Section 117, l. 1560), Part 3, pp. 31-33, (‘Ess Ruaid’)
M: Ess Ruaid I (See Section 117, l. 1560), Volume 4, pp. 3-7, pp. 375-376
M: Ess Ruaid II (See Section 117, l. 1560), Volume 4, pp. 7-9, pp. 376-377
B: Ess Ruaid §42 (See Section 117, l. 1560), pp. 505-506, (‘Ess Ruaid’)
S: Es [Aedha] Ruaidh (See Section 117, l. 1560), p. 526 (561)
R: Fid nGaible §11 (See Section 56, l. 474), Part 1, pp. 301-303, (‘Fid nGaible’)
M: Fid nGabli (See Section 56, l. 474), Volume 2, p. 59, p. 103
B: Fid nGaibli §6 (See Section 56, l. 474), pp. 474-475, (‘Fid nGaibli’)
S: Fidh Gaibhli (See Section 56, l. 474), p. 523 (558)
R: Findloch Cera §68 (See Section 505, l. 6785), Part 2, p. 468-469, (‘Findloch Cera’)
M: Find-Loch Cera (See Section 505, l. 6785), Volume 3, p. 379
E: Findloch Cera §67 (See Section 505, l. 6785), p. 486, (‘Findloch Cera’)
R: Gáirech §120 (See Section 259, l. 3441), Part 3, pp. 72-73, (‘Gáirech’)
M: Gáirech (See Section 259, l. 3441), Volume 4, p. 221, p. 435
S: Gáirech (See Section 259, l. 3441), p. 528 (563)
M: Glaisse Bulga (See Section 487, l. 6549), Volume 4, p. 289, p. 451
R: Inber Colptha (in Áth Cliath Cualann §28) (See Section 242, l. 3228), Part 1, pp. 328-329, (‘Inber Colptha’)
R: Indeóin na nDési (in Loch Léin §55) (See Section 195, l. 2600), Part 2, pp. 451-452, (‘Loch Léin’)
M: Indeóin na nDési (in Loch Lein) (See Section 195, l. 2600), Volume 3, pp. 261-265
B: Indeóin na nDési (in Loch Lein) §18 (See Section 195, l. 2600), pp. 485-486, (‘Loch Lein’)
S: Indeóin na nDési (in Loch Léin) (See Section 195, l. 2600), p. 523 (558)
R: Laigin §9 (See Section 72, l. 943), Part 1, pp. 299-301, (‘Laigin’)
M: Lagin I (See Section 72, l. 943), Volume 2, p. 51, p. 102
M: Lagin II (See Section 72, l. 943), Volume 2, p. 53, p. 102
B: Laigin §3 (See Section 72, l. 943), pp. 471-473, (‘Laigin’)
S: Laigin (See Section 72, l. 943), p. 500 (535)
M: Lind Feic (See Section 5, l. 56), Volume 4, p. 297, p. 454
R: Loch Léin §55 (See Section 50, l. 568), Part 2, pp. 451-452, (‘Loch Léin’)
M: Loch Lein (See Section 50, l. 568), Volume 3, pp. 261-265
B: Loch Lein §18 (See Section 50, l. 568), pp. 485-486, (‘Loch Lein’)
S: Loch Léin (See Section 50, l. 568, p. 523 (558)
R: Luimnech §57 (See Section 200, l. 2683), Part 2, pp. 452-454, (‘Luimnech’)
M: Luimnech (See Section 200, l. 2683), Volume 3, pp. 271-275
B: Luimnech §20 (See Section 200, l. 2683), pp. 486-488, (‘Luimnech’)
S: Luimnech (See Section 200, l. 2683), pp. 524-525 (559-560)
R: Mag n-Ái §69 (See Section 476, l. 6441), Part 2, p. 469, (‘Mag n-Ái’)
M: Mag nAi (See Section 476, l. 6441), Volume 3, p. 381
S: Mágh nAei (See Section 476, l. 6441), p. 539 (574)
R: Mag Femen, Mag Fera, Mag Fea §44 (See Section 195, l. 2600), Part 2, pp. 435-437, (‘Mag Femen, Mag Fera, Mag Fea’)
M: Mag Femin, Mag Fera, Mag Fea (See Section 195, l. 2600), Volume 3, p. 199
M: Mag Femin II, (See Section 195, l. 2600), Volume 3, p. 201-205
p. 205:

The oxen of Dil appeared 

on the plain by Loch Silend. (See Druim Silenn, §64; l. 850)

B: Mag Femin §16 (See Section 195, l. 2600), pp. 483-484, (‘Mag Femin’)
S: Mágh Femen (See Section 195, l. 2600), p. 523 (558), p. 529 (564)
R: Mag Luirg §72 (See Section 113, l. 1501), Part 2, pp. 472-473, (‘Mag Luirg’)
M: Mag Luirg (See Section 113, l. 1501), Volume 3, pp. 397-399
B: Mag Luirg §30 (See Section 113, l. 1501), p. 495, (‘Mag Luirg’)
S: Mágh Luirg (See Section 113, l. 1501), p. 525 (560)
R: Mag Mucraime §70 (See Section 91, l. 1159), Part 2, p. 470, (‘Mag Mucraime’)
M: Mag Mucrime (See Section 91, l. 1159), Volume 3, pp. 383-385
S: Mágh Mucramha (See Section 91, l. 1159), pp. 538-539 (573-574)
R: Mag Roigni §43 (See Section 322, l. 4513), Part 2, pp. 434-435, (‘Mag Roigni’)
M: Mag Raigne (See Section 322, l. 4513), Volume 3, pp. 195-197
B: Mag Raigni §12 (See Section 322, l. 4513), p. 480, (‘Mag Raigni’)
S: Mágh Raighne (See Section 322, l. 4513), p. 528 (563)
R: Maistiu §32 (See Section 346, l. 4815), Part 1, pp. 334-336, (‘Maistiu’)
M: Maistiu I (See Section 346, l. 4815), Volume 3, pp. 135-137
M: Maistiu II (See Section 346, l. 4815), Volume 3, p. 139
S: Maistiu (See Section 346, l. 4815), p. 530 (565)
M: Mide (See Section 8, l. 83), Volume 2, pp. 43-45, p.100
B: Mide §7 (See Section 8, l. 83), pp. 475-476, (‘Mide’)
S: Midhe (See Section 8, l. 83), p. 520 (555)
R: Moenmag §63 (See Section 27), Part 2, p. 461, (‘Moenmag’)
M: Moenmag (See Section 27, l. 278), Volume 3, p. 335-337
B: Mag Main (= Moenmag) §25 (See Section 27, l. 278), pp. 491-492, (‘Mag Main’)
S: Maenmhágh (See Section 27, l. 278), p. 525 (560)
S: Osraighe (See Section 154, l. 1964), p. 500 (535)
M: Rinn Eba (in Tráig Eba) (See Section 114, l. 1512), Volume 4, p. 293, p. 453
R: Sliab Bodbgnai (Slieve Bawne) (in Odras §113) (See Section 584, l. 7800), Part 3, pp. 64-65, (‘Slieve Bawne’)
M: Sliab Badbgna (See Section 584, l. 7800), Volume 4, p. 283, p. 450
R: Sliab Bladma §10 (See Section 49, l. 559), Part 1, p. 301, (‘Sliab Bladma’)
M: Sliab Bladma (See Section 49, l. 559), Volume 2, pp. 55-57, p. 102
B: Sliab Bladma §11 (See Section 49, l. 559), pp. 479-480, (‘Sliab Bladma’)
S: Sliabh Bladhma (See Section 49, l. 559), pp. 529-530 (564-565)
R: Sliab Cáin (in Luibnech §121) (See Section 56, l. 708), Part 3, pp. 73-74, (‘Sliab Cáin’)
R: Sliab Cua §157 (See Section 213, l. 2843) , Part 5, pp. 272-273
M: Slíab Cúa (See Section 213, l. 2843), Volume 4, pp. 339-341, p. 467
B: Sliab Cua §19 (See Section 213, l. 2843), p. 486, (‘Sliab Cua’)
S: Sliabh Cua (See Section 213, l. 2843), pp. 526-527 (561-562)
R: Sliab n-Echtga §60 (See Section 80, l. 1011), Part 2, pp. 458-459, (‘Sliab n-Echtga’)
M: Sliab nEchtga I (See Section 80, l. 1011), Volume 3, pp. 299-303
M: Sliab nEchtga II (See Section 80, l. 1011), Volume 3, pp. 305-313
B: Sliab nEchtga §21 (See Section 80, l. 1011), pp. 488-489, (‘Sliab nEchtga’)
S: Sliabh Echtga (See Section 80, l. 1011), p. 525 (560)
R: Slíab Fuait §100 (See Section 1, l. 7), Part 3, pp. 51-52, (‘Slíab Fuait’)
M: Sliab Fúait I (See Section 1, l. 7), Volume 4, pp. 163-167, pp. 419-420
M: Sliab Fúait II (See Section 1, l. 7), Volume 4, pp. 167-169, pp. 420-421
E: Sliab Fuait §64 (See Section 1, l. 7), pp. 483-484, (‘Sliab Fuait’)
S: Sliabh Fuaid (See Section 1, l. 7), p. 521 (556)
R: Sliab nGam §137 (See Section 497, l. 6706), Part 4, pp. 145, (‘Sliab nGam’)
M: Sliab Gam (See Section 497, l. 6706), Volume 3, p. 437
R: Sliab Mis §51 (See Section 283, l. 3760), Part 2, pp. 445-446, (‘Sliab Mis’)
M: Sliab Miss (See Section 283, l. 3760), Volume 3, p. 241
B: Sliab Mis §17 (See Section 283, l. 3760), pp. 484-485, (‘Sliab Mis’)
S: Sliabh Mis (See Section 283, l. 3760), p. 532 (567)
R: Slige Dala §58 (See Section 56, l. 700), Part 2, pp. 454-456, (‘Slige Dala’)
M: Slige Dala (See Section 56, l. 700), Volume 3, pp. 277-285
S: Slighe Dala (See Section 56, l. 700), p. 524 (559)
R: Snám Dá Én (in Móin Tíre Náir §105) (See Section 145, l. 1843), Part 3, pp. 56-57, (‘Snám dá Én’)
M: Snám Dá Én (See Section 145, l. 1843), Volume 4, pp. 351-367, pp. 471-473
S: Snám Dá Én (in Móin Tíre Náir) (See Section 145, l. 1843), p. 514 (549)
R: Tailtiu §99 (See Section 27, l. 265), Part 3, pp. 50-51, (‘Tailtiu’)
M: Tailtiu (See Section 27, l. 265), Volume 4, pp. 147-163, pp. 413-419
E: Mag Tailten §68 (See Section 27, l. 265), pp. 486-487, (‘Mag Tailten’)
S: Tailltiu (See Section 27, l. 265), p. 514 (549)
M: Tech Duinn (See Section 54, l. 662), Volume 4, p. 311, p. 459
R: Temair §1 (See Section 36, l. 362), Part 1, pp. 277-289, (‘Temair’)
M: Temair 1 (See Section 36, l. 362), Volume 1, pp. 3-5
M: Temair 2 (See Section 36, l. 362), Volume 1, pp. 7-13
M: Temair 3 (See Section 36, l. 362), Volume 1, pp. 15-27
M: Temair 4 (See Section 36, l. 362), Volume 1, pp. 29-37
M: Temair 5 (See Section 36, l. 362), Volume 1, pp. 39-45
B: Temuir §1 (See Section 36, l. 362), p. 470, (‘Temuir’)
S: Temhuir (See Section 36, l. 362), p. 514 (549)
R: Temair Luachra §50 (See Section 216, l. 2916), Part 2, pp. 444-445, (‘Temair Luachra’)
M: Temair Luachra (See Section 216, l. 2916), Volume 3, pp. 237-239
S: Temhair Luachra (See Section 216, l. 2916), p. 523 (558)
R: Tlachtga §110 (See Section 179, l. 2347), Part 3, pp. 61-62, (‘Tlachtga’)
M: Tlachtga (See Section 179, l. 2347), Volume 4, pp. 187-189, pp. 425-427
E: Tlachtga §73 (See Section 179, l. 2347), pp. 490-491, (‘Tlachtga’)
S: Tlachtgha (See Section 179, l. 2347), p. 511 (546)
R: Tond Clidna §45 (See Section 288, l. 3833), Part 2, pp. 437-438, (‘Tonn Clidna’)
‘And also in Patrick’s time as Cáilte sang on the same dind for their diverse, marvellous Colloquy which they made on Ireland’s topographical legends.’
M: Tond Clidna I (See Section 242, l. 3230), Volume 3, pp. 207-209
M: Tond Chlidna II (See Section 242, l. 3230), Volume 3, pp. 211-215
B: Tonn Clidna §10 (See Section 242, l. 3230), pp. 478-479, (‘Tonn Clidna’)
S: Tonn Chliodhna (See Section 242, l. 3230), p. 528 (563)
‘As also in S. Patrick’s time Caeilte indited on the same [adjacent] hill, in the course of that Colloquy which the two held anent Ireland’s dinnshenchas or ‘hill-lore’’
R: Uisnech (in Mide §7) (See Section 8, l. 83), Part 1, pp. 297-299, (‘Uisnech’)
M: Uisnech (in Mide) (See Section 8, l. 83), Volume 2, pp. 43-45, p. 100
B: Uisnech (in Mide §7) (See Section 8, l. 83), pp. 475-476, (‘Uisnech’)
S: Uisnech (in Midhe) (See Section 8, l. 83), pp. 520-521 (555-556)

Cóir Anmann: Fitness of Names (Stokes), Irische Texte, Ser. III.2
Aengus Turbech §99 (See Section 193, l. 2568), p. 331, p. 415
Ailill Ó-lomm §41 (See Section 90, l. 1149), pp. 305-307, p. 413 
Ána (Two Paps of Ána) (in Muma §1) (See Section 60, l. 774), p. 288, p. 412
Art mac Cuinn (= Art Óenfer §112) (See Section 131, l. 1693), pp. 335-337, p. 415
Cairbre Lifechair §114 (See Section 147, l. 1876), p. 337, p. 415
Connachta §76 (See Section 30, l. 308), p. 325, p. 414
Cormac Cás §165 (See Section 92, l. 1166), p. 361, p. 419
Crimhann Nía Nár §106 (See Section 294, l. 3945), p. 332, p. 415
Cruachu (in Medb of Cruachu §274) (See Section 292, l. 3890), p. 403, p. 424
Cú Chulainn §266 (See Section 176, l. 2316), pp. 399-401, p. 423
Dagda §§150-151 (See Section 23, l. 225), p. 355, p. 418
Dál n-Araide §249 (See Section 30, l. 312), pp. 391-393, p. 422
Déissi §169 (See Section 196, l. 2606), p. 363, p. 419
Dían cecht §157 (See Section 193, l. 2547), pp. 357-359, p. 418
Eremon son of Míl §78 (See Section 193, l. 2567), p. 325, p. 414
Eogan Mór §36 (See Section 90, l. 1148), p. 301, p. 413
Feradach Fechtnach §107 (See Section 240, l. 2470), p. 333, p. 415
Fiacha Muillethan §42 (See Section 91, l. 1161), pp. 307-309, p. 413
Fianna §222 (See Section 104, l. 1335), pp. 379-381, p. 421
Fir Bolg §224 (See Section 98, l. 1266), p. 381, p. 421
Fomoraig §234 (See Section 510, l. 6897), p. 383, p. 421
Gaileoin §212 (See Section 297, l. 3983), p. 375, p. 420
Gaileóin §226 (See Section 297, l. 3983), p. 381, p. 421
Goll mac Morna (in Mog Néit §35) (See Section 20, l. 208), p. 299
Iath nElga (in Elga §243) (See Section 193, l. 2557), p. 387
Labraid Lorc (= Labraid Loingsech §175) (See Section 193, l. 2552), p. 365, p. 419
Laigin §174 (See Section 72, l. 943), pp. 363-365, p. 419
Lugaid Lágda (= Lugaid Láigde §22) (See Section 193, l. 2560), p. 293, p. 412
Lugaid Mac Con (= Mac Con §71) (See Section 89, l. 1136), p. 323
Luigni §238 (See Section 507, l. 6829), p. 383, p. 422
Mannanán Mac lir §156 (See Section 274, l. 3650), p. 357, p. 418
Medb of Cruachu §274 (See Section 290, l. 3861), p. 403, p. 424
Mog Nuadat §40 (See Section 90, l. 1149), pp. 303-305
Mog Ruith §287 (See Section 193, l. 2544), p. 409, p. 425
Mór-rígan (in Tuatha Dé §149) (See Section 365, l. 5127), p. 355, p. 418
Muma §1 (See Section 54, l. 660), p. 289, p. 412
Nuada Airgeadlámh §154 (See Section 81, l. 1011), p. 357, p. 418
Ossairge §213 (See Section 154, l. 1964), p. 375, p. 420
Sétna Sibhbacc §186 (See Section 193, l. 2519), p. 367, p. 420
Tuathal Techtmar §109 (See Section 309, l. 4127), p. 333, p. 415
Ulaid §245 (See Section 30, l. 306), pp. 387-389, p. 422

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Wikipedia
Book of Lismore
Mythological Cycle
Fenian Cycle
Tuatha Dé Danann
Acallam na Senórach
Acallam Bec
Buile Shuibhne
Cath Finntrágha
Cath Gabhra
Cath Maige Mucruma
Táin Bó Cúailgne
The Boyhood Deeds of Finn
The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne
Aengus Mac ind Óc
Ailill Aulom; Kings of Munster
Aillén mac Midgna
Art mac Cuinn; High Kings of Ireland
Bodb Derg
Caílte mac Rónáin
Cairbre Lifechair; High Kings of Ireland
Cas Corach
Cathair Mór; High Kings of Ireland
Children of Lir
Clíodhna
Conaire Mór; High Kings of Ireland
Conall Cernach
Conn Cétchathach; High Kings of Ireland
Conán mac Mórna
Cormac Cas (Dál gCais)
Cormac mac Airt; High Kings of Ireland
Crimthann Nia Náir; High Kings of Ireland
Cumhall
Cú Roí; Kings of Munster
The Dagda; High Kings of Ireland
Danu
Dian Cecht
Diarmait mac Cerbaill; High Kings of Ireland; Kings of Uisnech
Diarmuid Ua Duibhne
Elcmar
Eochu Feidlech; High Kings of Ireland
Eochaid mac Eirc; High Kings of Ireland
Eógan Mór; Kings of Munster
Érimón; High Kings of Ireland
Feradach Finnfechtnach; High Kings of Ireland
Fiachu Muillethan; Kings of Munster
Fíachu Finnolach; High Kings of Ireland
Fianna
Fionn mac Cumhaill
Fir Bolg
Fochad Cairpthech and Fothad Airgthech; High Kings of Ireland
Fomorians
Goibniu
Goll mac Morna
Gráinne
Labraid Loingsech; Kings of Leinster
Lugaidh mac Con; High Kings of Ireland
Lugh; High Kings of Ireland
Manannán mac Lir
Medb
Mesgegra
Midir
Míl Espáine
The Morrígan
Mug Nuadat; Kings of Munster
Mug Ruith
Muirne
Nemed
Nuada Airgetlám; High Kings of Ireland
Oengus mac Nad Froích; Kings of Munster
Oisín
Oscar
Sadb ingen Chuinn
Sadhbh
Saint Benignus; Saints of Ireland
Saint Bridget of Kildare; Saints of Ireland
Saint Kevin (Cóemgen); Saints of Ireland
Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise; Saints of Ireland
Saint Colmán Elo; Saints of Ireland
Saint Columba (Colm Cille); Saints of Ireland
Saint Máedóc of Ferns; Saints of Ireland
Saint Mo Ling; Saints of Ireland
Saint Patrick; Saints of Ireland
Tadg mac Nuadat
Túathal Techtmar; High Kings of Ireland
Ben Bulben
Beltra (Tráig Eóchaille)
Brú na Bóinne
Caherconree
Caithness
Carnfree
Croagh Patrick
Dunseverick
Dunstaffnage Castle
Dursey Island
Glendalough
(The) Hebrides
Hill of Allen
Hill of Tara
Hill of Ward (Tlachtga)
Islay
Isle of Arran
Kintyre
Liath Macha and Dub Sainglend
Mellifont Abbey
(The) Mounth
Mourne Mountains
Mullaghmast
Newgrange
Oweynagat (The Cave of Cruachan)
Paps of Anu
Rathcroghan (Cruachan)
Rock of Cashel
Salmon of Knowledge
Slievenamon
St. Mullins
Tailtiu
Tara
Uisneach
Ventry

Early Christian Sites in Ireland
Aghagower
Ardpatrick
Armagh
Cashel
Croagh Patrick
Durrow
Ferns
Glendalough
Kildare
Roscommon
Roscrea
Oran
St Mullins

Voices from the Dawn
Knock Áine
Newgrange
Rathcroghan
Teltown

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