Irish Sagas at UCC University College Cork

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Tochmarc Étaíne

Background information

References in the Annals of the Four Masters

M3304.1 The first year of the reign of Breas, son of Ealathan, over Ireland; for the Tuatha De Danann gave him the sovereignty, after gaining the battle of Magh Tuireadh Conga, while the hand of Nuadhat was under cure.

M3310.1 This was the seventh year of Breas over Ireland, when he resigned the kingdom to Nuadhat, after the cure of his hand by Diancecht, assisted by Creidne, the artificer, for they put a silver hand upon him.

M3331.1 The first year of the reign of Lugh Lamhfhada over Ireland.

M3370.1 After the fortieth year of the reign of Lugh Lamhfhada over Ireland, he fell by Mac Cuill at Caendruim.

M3371.1 The first year of the reign of Eochaidh Ollathair, who was named the Daghda, over Ireland.

M3450.1 After the completion of the last year of the eighty years which Eochaidh Ollathar passed in the monarchy of Ireland, he died at Brugh, of the venom of the wound which Cethlenn inflicted upon him in the first battle of Magh Tuireadh.

M3451.1 This was the first year of the reign of Dealbhaeth, son of Ogma, over Ireland.

M5069.1 Eochaidh Feidhleach, son of Finn, son of Finnlogha, after having been twelve years in the sovereignty of Ireland, died at Teamhair.

M5084.1 Eochaidh Aireamh, after having been fifteen years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was burned by Sighmall, at Freamhainn.

M5089.1 Ederscel, son of Eoghan, son of Oilioll, after having been five years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Nuadha Neacht, at Aillinn.

M5090.1 Nuadha Neacht, son of Sedna Sithbhaic, after having spent half a year in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the battle of Cliach, in Ui Drona, by Conaire Mor.

M5091.1 The first year of Conaire Mor, son of Ederscel, in the sovereignty of Ireland.

M5160.1 Conaire, son of Ederscel, after having been seventy years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain at Bruighean Da Dhearg, by insurgents.


Lebor Gabála Érenn (Macalister), Volume 3

p. 151 Bethach son of Iarbonel the Soothsayer son of Nemed — his seed went into the northern islands of the world to learn druidry and heathenism and devilish knowledge, so that they were expert in every art, and they were afterwards the Tuatha De Danann.


Lebor Gabála Érenn (Macalister), Volume 4

pp. 113-115 Nuadu Airgetlam, he it is who was king over the Tuatha De Danann for seven years before their coming into Ireland, till his arm was cut from him in the first battle of Mag Tuired. … He had an arm of silver … which Dian Cecht the leech put upon him.

p. 121 Lugh son of Ethniu was forty years in the kingship of Ireland after the last battle of Mag Tuired.

p. 127 Midir of Bri Leith son of Indui son of Echtach son of Etarlam.

p. 131 Boind daughter of Delbaeth son of Elada.

p. 191 Sigmall son of Cairpre Crom son of Elcmar.

p.181 Nuadu Airgedlam fell in the last battle of Mag Tuired … Ogma son of Elatha son of Net fell … Many were slain in that battle, both Tuatha De Danann and Fomoraig, and Bres along with them.

p. 181 Eochaid Ollathair, the Great Dagda, son of Elada, was eighty years in the kingship of Ireland. He had three sons, Oengus, Aed and Cermat the fair. Upon these four did the men of Ireland make the Mound of the Brug.

p. 189 The seven sons of Delbaeth son of Ogma were … and Elcmar of the Brug.

p. 191 Oengus mac in nOg and Aed Caem and Cermat Milbel, the three sons of the Dagda, son of Elada.

p. 231 Sigmall, grandson of free Midir.

p. 233

Midir son of Indui yonder
fell by the hand of Elcmar:
fell Elcmar, fit for fight,
at the hands of Oengus the perfect.

p. 237 (See Section 1.26, Section 3.21)
Fuamnach the white (?) who was wife of Midir,
Sigmall and Bri without faults,
In Bri Leith, it was full vigour,
they were burnt by Manannan.

Lebor Gabála Érenn (Macalister), Volume 5

pp. 19-21 Then a plot to slay Íth was laid by the Túatha Dé Danann. They sent a strong troop after him, who inflicted a death-wound upon him in Mag Ítha; from him is the plain named.

pp. 299-301 Eochu Feidlech took the kingship of Ireland for a space of twelve years … till he fell in Temair.
Eochu Airem, brother to Eochu Feidlech, took the kingship of Ireland for a space of fifteen years … till he was burned in Fremain by Sigmall Sithienta. Or it was the men of Cúl Breg who burnt him, by reason of the heaviness of the tax which he imposed on them.
The Provincials thereafter, Conchobor son of Fachtna, Coirpre Nia Fer, Tigernach Tétbannach, Cú Roí son of Daire, Ailill son of Mata.
Eterscél Mór … took the [kingship of Ireland] for a space of five years. … Eterscél fell at the hands of Nuadu Necht … in the battle of Aillenn.
Nuadu Necht took the kingship of Ireland thereafter for a space of two seasons … till he fell at the hands of Conaire Mór son of Eterscél.
Conaire Mór took the kingship of Ireland for a space of seventy years … till he fell in Buiden Dá Derga at the hands of the Bandits of Ireland and of Ingcel Cáech of the Britons.


The History of Ireland (Geoffrey Keating), Volume 1

pp. 217-219 Of the branching of the tribe that was noblest of the Tuatha Dé Danann down here.
Eochaidh Ollathar, i.e. the Daghdha, Oghma, Allód, Breas and Dealbhaoth, the five sons of Ealatha … Manannán son of Allód, son of Ealatha … Aonghus, Aodh, Cearmadh and Mídhir, the four sons of the Dághdha. Lúgh, son of Cian, son of Dianchéacht … Dianchéacht the physician.

pp. 221-223 Breas, son of Ealatha, … held the kingship seven years.
Lúgh Lámhfada, son of Cian, son of Dianchéacht, … held the kingdom of Ireland forty years.
The Daghdha Mór, son of Ealatha, … held the kingdom of Ireland seventy years. He died at Brugh of the bloody missiles of a cast which Ceithleann flung at him in the battle of Magh Tuireadh. Eochaidh Ollathar (was) the proper name of the Daghdha.


The History of Ireland (Geoffrey Keating), Volume 2

pp. 55-57 As to the sons of Cearmad (of the Tuatha De Danann), … they resolved to send the son of Coll with thrice fifty warriors in pursuit of him. These overtook him, and Ioth placed himself in the rear of his party, and conducted them to northwards Magh Iotha; and a conflict took place between them, and Ioth fell there.

p. 159 It was Eochaidh Feidhlioch who divided the provinces of Ireland amongst the following. … he gave the two provinces of Munster to Tighearnach Teidbheannach son of Luchta, and to Deaghaidh son of Sin.

p. 185 Eochaidh Feidhlioch … held the sovereignty of Ireland twelve years. … He was called Eochaidh Feidhlioch, for he suffered long from sighing, for feidhil means ‘long’, and uch means ‘a sigh’, hence Feidhlioch means ‘a long sigh’. For his heart was never without a sigh since he slew his sons in the Battle of Drom Criaidh until his own death. … And this Eochaidh Feidhlioch it was who first divided Ireland into provinces and instituted provincials. … He gave the two provinces of Munster to Tighearnach Teadbhannach and to Deaghaidh.

p. 189 After this Meadhbh took for her husband Oilill Mor son of Rossa Ruadh, a Leinsterman. Mada Muirisc, a Connaughtwoman, was his mother. … There were war and strife for a long time between the people of Connaught and those of Ulster while Meadhbh held sway over Connaught, and Conchubhar was king of Ulster.

pp. 229-233 Eochaidh Airiomh … held the sovereignty of Ireland twelve years. He was called Eochaidh Airiomh because it was he who first dug a cave in Ireland. Now Airiomh is the same as ‘ar uaimhe’, that is, ‘the ploughing or digging of a cave’; and finally this Eochaidh fell by Siodhmall in Freamhainn Teathbha.
Eidirsceol son of Eoghan, son of Oilill, son of Iar, … held the sovereignty of Ireland six years, and he fell by Nuadha Neacht in Aillinn. … And this Nuadha fell by Conaire Mor son of Eidirsceol.
Conaire Mor son of Eidirsceol, son of Eoghan, … held the sovereignty of Ireland thirty years, or, according to others, seventy years. … Conaire Mor fell in Bruighean Da Bhearg by Aingceal Caoch son of the king of Britain.

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Related saga online: Togail Bruidne Da Derga (The Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), Revue Celtique, 22, 1901, pp. 13-61, 165-215, 282-329, 401-402; 23, 1902, p. 88.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 13-61); (pp. 165-215); (pp. 282-329); (pp. 401-402); (p. 88); English translation at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
pp. 14-16, §§1-2 Étaín daughter of Étar (See Section 1.21)
p. 17, §3 Eochaid and Étaín (See Sections 2.2)
pp. 19-21, §§5-8 Etirscél and Conaire (See Section 3.20)
p. 402 A Recension of the Book of Druim Snechta, this. The Destruction of the Hostel of húa Derga, after its foretales i. e. after the Loss of Étáin Ailill’s daughter and after the Oppressive Company of Eochaid Airem, and after the Disclosure of the Elfmound of Mac Óc to Midir of Brí Léith in his elfmound. Conaire son of Eterscél, greatgrandson of Íar, of the Ernai of Munster, ’tis he that was destroyed in this Hostel. Now his mother was Mess Búachalla (‘the Cowherds’ fosterling’), and she was a daughter of Eochaid Airem and a daughter of Étáin’s daughter, as we have said. So that Conaire by his mother’s side (belonged) to Eochaid, i.e. Conaire grandson of Eochaid, i. e. son of the daughter of Eochaid’s daughter was he. (See Section 3.20)

Related saga online: Aislinge Óenguso (The Dream of Óengus)
Francis Shaw (ed.), The Dream of Óengus: Aislinge Óenguso, (Dublin: Brown & Nolan Limited, 1934; repr. 1976), pp. 43-64.
Digital Edition at CDI (PDF) (pp. 43-64 (37-58)); Irish text at CELT
Lovesickness (See Section 2.3), §1, pp. 43-44 (37-38)
Two swans (See Section 3.15), §14, p. 63 (57)

Related text online: De gabáil in t-shída (Concerning the seizure of the fairy mound)
Vernam Hull (ed. & tr.), De gabáil in t-shída (Concerning the seizure of the fairy mound), Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 19, 1933, pp. 53-58.
Irish text at CELT; English translation at Tech Screpta
Aengus and Brú na Bóinne (See Section 1.6, Section 1.7, Section 1.8)

Related saga online: Aided Chonchobuir (The Death of Conchobar)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), The Death-Tales of the Ulster Heroes, (Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co., 1906; repr. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1993), pp. 2-21.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 2-21); Digital Edition at NLS.uk (pp. 2-21 (14-33); Irish text at CELT; English translation at CELT; English translation at MaryJones.us; English translation at Tech Screpta; English translation at Tech Screpta; German translation at Archive.org (pp. 69-72 (87-90))

Related saga online: Aided Chon Roí (The tragic death of Cúroí Mac Dári)
R. I. Best (ed. & tr.), Ériu, 4, Dublin, 1905, pp. 18-35.
Digital Edition at JSTOR; English translation at MaryJones.us; English translation at Tech Screpta

Related saga online: Aided Ailella ocus Conaill Chernaig (The Death of Ailill and Conall Cernach)
Kuno Meyer (ed. & tr.), Zeitschrift für Celtische Philologie, 1, 1897, pp. 102-111.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 102-111); English translation at Tech Screpta

Related saga online: Talland Étair (the Siege of Howth)
Whitley Stokes (ed. & tr.), Revue Celtique, 8, 1887, pp. 47-64.
Digital Edition at Archive.org (pp. 47-64); Irish text at CELT; English translation at Archive.org (pp. 85-100 (176-186)); German translation at Archive.org (pp. 66-69 (84-87))

Lectures of the Manuscript Materials of Ancient Irish History (O’Curry)
List of Historic Tales in the Book of Leinster includes:
Tochmarc Etaine (The Courtship of Etain), p. 585 (621)

Airec Menman Uraird Maic Coise (Byrne), Anecdota from Irish Manuscripts, Volume 2
List of the gnathscela Herenn includes:
Gabail int Sidhe, p. 43 (139), §3, line 5
Aislingi in Maic Oig, p. 43 (139), §3, line 6

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R = The Rennes Dindshenchas (Stokes), Revue Celtique, 15-16, 1894-95
M = The Metrical Dindshenchas (Gwynn)
B = The Bodleian Dinnshenchas (Stokes), Folklore, 3, 1892
E = The Edinburgh Dinnshenchas (Stokes), Folklore, 4, 1893
S = Silva Gadelica (O’Grady), Volume 2
R: Boand §19 (See Section 1.5), Part 1, pp. 315-316, (‘Boand’)
M: Boand I (See Section 1.5), Volume 3, pp. 27-33
M: Boand II (See Section 1.5), Volume 3, pp. 35-39
B: Boann §36 (See Section 1.5), p. 500, (‘Boann’)
S: Bóann (See Section 1.5), pp. 519-520 (554-555)
R: Brefne §149 (See Section 3.5), Part 4, pp.162-164, (‘Brefne’)
M: Bréfne (See Section 3.5), Volume 4, pp. 253-357, p. 443
R: Bri Léith §126 (See Section 1.2), Part 3, pp. 77-78, (‘Bri Léith’)
M: Brí Léith (See Section 1.2), Volume 4, p. 229, p. 437
B: Bri Léith §9 (See Section 1.2), pp. 477-478, (‘Bri Léith’)
S: Brí Léith (See Section 1.2), p. 522 (557)
R: Dindgnai in Broga §4 (See Section 1.1), Part 1, pp. 292-293, (‘Dindgnai in Broga’)
M: Brug na Bóinde I (See Section 1.1), Volume 2, pp. 11-17, pp. 92-94
M: Brug na Bóinde II (See Section 1.1), Volume 2, pp. 19-25, pp. 95-96
R: Cleitech §114 (See Section 1.8), Part 3, pp. 65-66, (‘Cleitech’)
M: Cleitech (See Section 1.8), Volume 4, pp. 201-203,
B: Cleittech §47 (See Section 1.8), pp. 511-512, (‘Cleittech’)
S: Cleiteach (See Section 1.8), p. 534 (569)
S: Connachta (See Section 3.23), p. 509 (543)
R: Inber Cichmaini §126 (See Section 1.21), Part 3, p. 56, (‘Inber Cichmaini’)
M: Inber Cichmaine (See Section 1.21), Volume 4, p. 177-179, pp. 422-423
E: Inber Cichmaini §74 (See Section 1.21), pp. 491-492, (‘Inber Cichmaini’)
R: Mag n-Ailbe (in Eó Rossa §160) (See Section 1.23), Part 5, pp. 277-279
M: Mag Ailbe (in Eo Rossa, Eo Mugna, etc.) (See Section 1.23), Volume 3, p. 149
R: Mag mBreg §111 (See Section 3.1), Part 3, pp. 62-63, (‘Mag mBreg’)
M: Mag Breg (See Section 3.1), Volume 4, pp. 191-193, p. 427
B: Mag mBreg §2 (See Section 3.1), pp. 470-471, (‘Mag mBreg’)
S: Mágh mBregh (See Section 3.1), p. 517 (552)
R: Mag n-Itha §90 (See Section 1.13), Part 3, p. 40, (‘Mag n-Itha’)
M: Mag Itha (See Section 1.13), Volume 4, pp. 91-93, pp. 398-399
B: Mag n-Itha §52 (See Section 1.13), p. 515, (‘Mag n-Itha’)
M: Mag Muirthemne (See Section 1.13), Volume 4, p. 295, p.454
R: Mide §7 (See Section 2.1), Part 1, pp. 297-298, (‘Mide’)
M: Mide (See Section 2.1), Volume 2, pp. 43-45, p.100
B: Mide §7 (See Section 2.1), pp. 475-476, (‘Mide’)
S: Midhe (See Section 2.1), p. 520 (555)
R: Raith Cruachan §65, Part 2, p. 463-464, (‘Raith Cruachan’)
M: Rath Cruachan, Volume 3, pp. 349-355
B: Mag Cruachan §27, pp. 492-493, (‘Mag Cruachan’)
S: Ráth Chruachan, p. 539 (574)
R: Ráith Ésa §3, Part 1, pp. 290-291, (‘Ráith Esa’)
M: Rath Esa, Volume 2, pp. 3-9, pp. 89-91
p. 7 (See Section 3.5)

This is the fourfold demand
that Eochaid Airem made,
with many a distinguished company,
with tale of shields and swords:

To build a causeway across the bog of Lamraige,
to plant a wood growing wild over Brefne,
to clear stones from the Bottoms of great Mide,
and to set rushes over Tebtha.

R: Slaine (in Loch Garman §40, subsection 4) (See Section 1.14), Part 2, pp. 428-431, (‘Slaney’)
R: Slíab Fuait §100 (See Section 3.20), Part 3, pp. 51-52, (‘Slíab Fuait’)
M: Sliab Fúait I (See Section 3.20), Volume 4, pp. 163-167, pp. 419-420
M: Sliab Fúait II (See Section 3.20), Volume 4, pp. 167-169, pp. 420-421
E: Sliab Fuait §64 (See Section 3.20), pp. 483-484, (‘Sliab Fuait’)
S: Sliabh Fuaid (See Section 3.20), p. 521 (556)
R: Temair §1 (See Section 2.2), Part 1, pp. 277-289, (‘Temair’)
M: Temair 1 (See Section 2.2), Volume 1, pp. 3-5
M: Temair 2 (See Section 2.2), Volume 1, pp. 7-13
M: Temair 3 (See Section 2.2), Volume 1, pp. 15-27
M: Temair 4 (See Section 2.2), Volume 1, pp. 29-37
M: Temair 5 (See Section 2.2), Volume 1, pp. 39-45
B: Temuir §1 (See Section 2.2), p. 470, (‘Temuir’)
S: Temhuir (See Section 2.2), p. 514 (549)
R: Tethba §127 (See Section 2.1), Part 3, pp. 79-80, (‘Tethba’)
M: Tethba (See Section 2.1), Volume 4, p. 231, pp. 437-438
B: Tethba §13 (See Section 2.1), pp. 480-481, (‘Tethba’)
S: Tebtha (See Section 2.1), p. 518 (553)
R: Uisnech (in Mide §7) (See Section 1.5), Part 1, pp. 297-299, (‘Uisnech’)
M: Uisnech (in Mide) (See Section 1.5), Volume 2, pp. 43-45, p. 100
B: Uisnech (in Mide §7) (See Section 1.5), pp. 475-476, (‘Uisnech’)
S: Uisnech (in Midhe) (See Section 1.5), pp. 520-521 (555-556)

Cóir Anmann: Fitness of Names (Stokes), Irische Texte, Ser. III.2
Connachta §76 (See Section 3.23), p. 325, p. 414
Dagda §§150-151 (See Section 1.1), p. 355, p. 418
Dian-cecht §157 (See Section 1.10), pp. 357-359, p. 418
Eochaid Airem §103 (See Section 2.1), p. 331, p. 415
Eochaid Feidlech §102 (See Section 2.3), p. 331, p. 415
Fir Bolg §224 (See Section 1.3), p. 381, p. 421
Mannanán Mac lir §156 (See Section 1.26), p. 357, p. 418
Tuatha Dé §149 (See Section 1.1), p. 355, p. 418
Ulaid §245 (See Section 1.21), pp. 387-389, p. 422

Wikipedia
Egerton 1782
Lebor na hUidre
Yellow Book of Lecan
Irish mythology
Mythological Cycle
Tuatha Dé Danann
Tochmarc Étaíne
Aengus = In Mac Óc
Ailill mac Máta; Kings of Connacht
Boann
Bres; High Kings of Ireland
Conchobar mac Nessa; Kings of Ulster
Conaire Mór; High Kings of Ireland
Cú Ruí; Kings of Munster
Dagda; High Kings of Ireland
Danu
Dian Cecht
Elcmar
Eochu Airem; High Kings of Ireland
Eochu Feidlech; High Kings of Ireland
Étaín
Eterscél Mór; High Kings of Ireland
Fir Bolg
Fuamnach
Lugh; High Kings of Ireland
Manannán mac Lir
Mesgegra
Midir
Ogma
Brú na Bóinne
Newgrange
Slievenamon
Tara
Tethbae
Uisneach

Voices from the Dawn
Newgrange

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